Reflection on Sitting and Listening

As Jesus and his disciples went on their way, Jesus entered a village where a woman named Martha welcomed him into her home. She had a sister named Mary, who sat at the Lord’s feet and listened to what he was saying. But Martha was distracted by her many tasks; so she came to him and asked, “Lord, do you not care that my sister has left me to do all the work by myself? Tell her then to help me.” But the Lord answered her, “Martha, Martha, you are worried and distracted by many things; there is need of only one thing. Mary has chosen the better part, which will not be taken away from her.” (Luke 10:38-42 NRSV).

This Gospel narrative contains St. Benedict’s Ora et Labora (pray and work) way of life. St. Benedict taught that prayer and work are connected to each other and not meant to be separated. The message in today’s Gospel and what St. Benedict taught suggests that work is first and foremost a prayerful partnership with God in the occupation of co-creation. If our work is to be truly profitable, then it should bring us to a closer relationship with God.

Jesus is not scolding Martha. I suggest that Jesus is telling her that working too much can take us away from allowing God to feed our souls. A contemplative individual takes time in solitude and silence to quiet our interior self, to help us listen for the Holy Spirit more attentively outside of ourselves. St. Benedict teaches us to listen and “incline the ear of the heart” so we can focus on listen for Jesus in all aspects of our lives. We need to listen for God in our work, relationships, personal challenges and daily responsibilities. We are not expected to get everything correct. The spiritual life is not a matter of achievement awards or scholarly discoveries. God calls to us in the deepest spaces of our lives, to respond to God’s invitation to make a home with God within our essence.

How are you seeking union with God through your life of prayer and work?

Amen.

Peace be with all who enter here

Brother Anselm Philip King-Lowe, OSB

You are invited to view my website to learn about my ministry of Spiritual and Grief Companionship. If you or someone you know could benefit from my ministry, please contact me.

If you feel led to buy me some coffee to help support this ministry, please scroll down to the bottom of the right sidebar and click on the Benedictine Coffee Mug. Thank you so much.

Reflection on the Path of Life

“You will show me the path of life; in your presence there is fullness of joy, and in your right hand are pleasures for evermore.” (Psalm 16:11, The Book of Common Prayer, p.600).

Traveling along on a path can bring a mixture of emotions. It is great to get away from the stress of life to walk on a new path. Yet, even a familiar path can cause some anxiety. What will we discover on the path? Will we be lifted up, or brought down by fear because of something unexpected?

The path of life that God puts before us every day is full of things we can predict. When we become too wrapped up in what is predictable, we can become too self absorbed. The unexpected and unusual will show up. It will meet us in our “cell.” It will teach us what God’s true joys and pleasures are. God finds so much joy and pleasure in us, because of God’s extravagant love. To find God’s joys and pleasures, we must let go, and allow God to show us what path we need to be on.

The contemplative is always searching for union with God in the many experiences of life. Contemplative prayer asks us to be open to what God’s paths are to learn about where God is leading us. The contemplative is looking for ways to turn ourselves over to what disturbs our comfort zones, to be reformed and reshaped to find God’s pleasures and joys that are beyond time and temporary things.

“In God’s goodness, we are already counted as God’s own…” (The Rule of Benedict : a Spirituality for the 21st Century, by Sr. Joan Chittister, OSB, p.5).

God wants the show you the path of life. Get ready to learn God’s fullness of joy and pleasures.

Amen.

Peace be with all who enter here.

Brother Anselm Philip King-Lowe, OSB

If you or someone you know could benefit from my ministry of Spiritual and Grief Companionship, visit my website.

If you feel led to buy me some coffee to help support this ministry, please scroll down to the bottom of the right sidebar and click on the Benedictine Coffee Mug. Thank you so very much.