Reflection on Patience in the Heart

“Be patient, beloved, until the coming of the Lord. The farmer waits for the precious crop from the earth, being patient with it until it receives the early and the late rains. You also must be patient. Strengthen your hearts, for the coming of the Lord is near.” (See James 5:7-10 NRSV).

This is the time of the season when our patience grows thin. The celebration of the Nativity is ten days away. We are still in the season of Advent. We continue watching, waiting and preparing. Today, we read from James “You must also be patient. Strengthen your hearts, for the coming of the Lord is near.”

The electric and technological developments that bring us social media with iPhones or Smartphones, have made waiting and patience an antiquated way of living. We can pay our bills, move money, order groceries and clothing without leaving our homes at lightening speed. Such advances are doing exactly what they are intended to do. As a result, our capacity for waiting patiently has been compromised. It effects our spiritual awareness of God moving slower, to draw us into a deeper relationship with God.

The image of the farmer planting the seeds is a perfect illustration here. To live as a contemplative, we must see ourselves as the seeds that God has planted to grow and bloom into the most beautiful human beings. In this season of Advent, God wants us to slow down, to spend some time in silence and solitude and open our hearts to the presence of God who is already here. Greater things come to those who meditate and receive God’s wondrous love, so that God can add even more of the grace that is transformative. This transformation is not dependent on having the correct theology. The transforming grace of God is beyond logic and is so much richer than doctrine or dogma. God’s grace through Jesus, the Incarnate Word meets us in the deepest places within us and gives new life, again and again. This is why we wait in patience and strengthen our hearts.

“What is not possible for us by nature, let us ask the Lord to supply by the help of his grace.” (RB 1980: The Rule of St. Benedict in English, p.18).

What will waiting patiently for God mean for you?

Amen.

Peace be with all who enter here.

Brother Anselm Philip King-Lowe, OSB

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Reflection on The Mountain of God

“In days to come the mountain of the Lord’s house shall be established as the highest of the mountains, and shall be raised above the hills; all the nations shall stream to it. Many peoples shall come and say, “Come, let us go up to the mountain of the Lord, to the house of the God of Jacob; that he may teach us his ways and that we may walk in his paths.” (See Isaiah 2:1-5 NRSV).

As we begin the Season of Advent, I want to use a quote from Illuminated Life: Monastic Wisdom for Seekers of Light by Sr. Joan Chittister, OSB.

“What is right in front of us we see least. We take the plants in the room for granted. We pay no attention to the coming of night, we miss the invitation to look on a neighbor’s face. We see only ourselves in action and miss the cocoon around us. As a result, we run the risk of coming out of every situation with no more than when we went into it.” (P.22).

When I first read the words from Isaiah, I am not happy about waiting. I want God to answer my prayer with the conclusion I want. I am met with my false-sense of self. My false-sense of self is not necessarily bad. Nor is my false-sense of self (and yours) something that God ignores or thinks is unimportant. On the contrary, God is most concerned with what is wounded within us. That which makes us happy is something that is there through which God’s Grace can do wondrous things with. Katherine Howard in her book, Praying with Benedict wrote,

“God’s love for us does not depend on us doing everything right or on our always feeling or being strong physically, emotionally or spiritually. …. Sometimes we hear God’s voice from within saying, ‘I know you; I love you just as you are. I will be your strength and consolation. My mercy, not your own strength, will save you.'” (P.107).

God invites us in this holy season of Advent to wait in silence and contemplation, so that we may be open to the presence of God before us in the here and now. If we are preparing for Jesus to come in the future, we must allow God to help us see Jesus already with us. Spiritual awakening for the contemplative, is being aware that God is all around us.

“Let us get up, then, at long last, for the Scriptures rouse us when they say: It is high time for us to arise from sleep (Rom 13:11). Let us open our eyes to the light that comes from God, and our ears to the voice that lays out this charge: If you hear his voice today, do not harden your hearts (Ps, 95:8).” (RB 1980: The Rule of St. Benedict in English, p.15-16).

How will you climb God’s mountain this Advent?

Amen.

Peace be with all who enter here.

Brother Anselm Philip King-Lowe, OSB

Visit my website Br. Anselm Philip’s Spiritual and Grief Companionship Ministry.

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Reflection on God’s Wondrous Love

“Blessed be the Lord! for he has shown me the wonders of his love in a besieged city.” (Psalm 31:21. The Book of Common Prayer).

Sometimes when our lives seem to have fallen apart, we might compare the experience to being a city that was under siege and left in ruins. Everything that was is no longer. The destruction and debris is everywhere. Nothing that was standing is without need to be rebuilt or repaired.

In Chapter 7 of The Rule of St. Benedict, he challenges us in the sixth and seventh degrees of humility. He writes about acceptance of even the harshest treatment and learning to say with Psalm 22:6 “I am a worm and no man, scorned by all and despised by the people.”

In his book The Rule of Saint Benedict: Initiation into the Monastic Tradition, Thomas Merton stresses that St. Benedict is that to live with a low self-esteem is the opposite of humility because by it, we draw too much attention to ourselves. He goes on to say that Benedict is telling us to let go of our false-sense of self. To learn to trust in God when our lives are shaken to pieces, as opposed to trusting in the little things of life to feel whole.

A contemplative learns over the course of a lifetime that seeking union with God for no other reason than God alone is to have all that we need. Yes, it takes all of our lives through moments of quiet time and living with God in the various moments in life to let go and let God be our everything. In the moments when things that were fall apart, that is where God’s wondrous love becomes best known in the whole of ourselves. When we experience the wonder of God’s love through contemplation and mysticism, the besieged city of our lives is a new beginning, and never a conclusion.

How are you experiencing God’s wondrous love in the besieged cities of your life?

Amen.

Peace be with all who enter here.

Brother Anselm Philip King-Lowe, OSB

Reflection on New Things

“I saw a new heaven and a new earth; for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and the sea was no more. And I saw the holy city, the new Jerusalem, coming down out of heaven from God, prepared as a bride adorned for her husband.” (See Revelation 21:1-4 NRSV) .

My family and I recently moved to new home. It has been a stressful time. It is also why I have not written a blog entry in a while. Moving into a new home brings a lot of chaos. There is the endlessness of letting go of how things have been for so long. Getting rid of things that no longer serve a purpose. Brining together so many loose ends to make a new beginning.

As we contemplate All Saints Day, All Souls, with this reading from Revelation; we cannot help but meet a profound mystical experience. The Saints and those who have gone before us give us a vision of a new Heaven and a new earth in the here and now. God meets us where we are; in our moments of chaos and grief to speak with our hearts. God is working in our contemplative consciousness to transform us through the chaos; not from it. God is drawing us away from our false-sense of self that wants everything so neatly planned out and organized; to a new way of life through Jesus Christ and His redemption of our souls through healing and reconciliation.

At the end of The Rule of St. Benedict, he states that it is a Rule for beginners. That is why we return to the Prologue to reread those famous words; “Listen my child. Incline the ears of your heart.” The new Heaven and earth are coming to us in the here and now. This moment, place and time is where God is drawing us into a deeper relationship with God’s Self to bring a new revelation to our hearts and lives through which the Holy Spirit will “renew the face of the earth.” (Psalm 104:31).

Are you listening with the ear of your heart for God to bring a new Heaven and earth in your life?

Amen.

Peace be with all who enter here.

Brother Anselm Philip King-Lowe, OSB

Visit my website for information about my ministry of Spiritual and Grief Companionship.

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Reflection on the Potter and the Clay.

The word that came to Jeremiah from the Lord: “Come, go down to the potter’s house, and there I will let you hear my words.” So I went down to the potter’s house, and there he was working at his wheel. The vessel he was making of clay was spoiled in the potter’s hand, and he reworked it into another vessel, as seemed good to him. Then the word of the Lord came to me: Can I not do with you, O house of Israel, just as this potter has done? says the Lord. Just like the clay in the potter’s hand, so are you in my hand, O house of Israel. (See Jeremiah 18:1-11 NRSV).

What makes contemplative prayer unique from other forms of prayer? Isn’t going to a church service enough?

There e are many forms of prayer for the Christian. Liturgical prayer. Intercessory prayer. Devotional prayer. These and other prayer forms are all important. Contemplative prayer is about what is inside of our hearts. Where other forms of prayer seem to stop at the end of our lips and minds; contemplative prayer takes us on the longest journey; from the head to the heart. Lectio Divina or the prayerful reading of the Scriptures is a contemplative type of prayer. The words of Scripture that we read very slowly go into our eyes and mouth, then down deep into our deepest selves where the Holy Spirit speaks to us through the words. God teaches our hearts as we meditate on what God wants us to learn from what we read. The next step is to pray to God for ourselves to be led into a deeper awareness and relationship through what we learned. The last part of Lectio Divina is to sit in the presence of God in contemplation to just be there and do nothing else.

In contemplation, we allow God to be the potter to mold and shape us from within our interior self.

“We can’t see God by some sort of intellectual vision, because cognition depends on a sensory infrastructure which cannot see divinity. It is only at the level of spirit that God is visible” (Michael Casey. Toward God: The Ancient Wisdom of Western Prayer., p.163).

St. Benedict wrote The Rule as an instruction to the heart about letting go of the many things we cling to. He knew that God wants us to be so much more than what we think we can be. God is at work in us through contemplative prayer to be the most beautiful and amazing person from the inside out.

“Let them prefer nothing whatever to Christ, and may he bring us to everlasting life” (RB 1980: The Rule of St. Benedict in English, p.95).

How is God working like a potter with the clay in your heart?

Amen.

Peace be with all who enter here.

Brother Anselm Philip King-Lowe, OSB

Visit: Br. Anselm Philip’s Ministry of Spiritual and Grief Companionship.

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Reflection on Ora et Labora

“May the graciousness of the Lord our God be upon us; prosper the work of our hands; prosper our handiwork.” (Psalm 90:17 The Book of Common Prayer, p. 719).

“Idleness is the enemy of the soul. Therefore, the brothers should have specified periods of manual labor as well as for prayerful reading.” (RB 1980: The Rule of St. Benedict in English. Chapter 48;1, p.69).

The times we are living through do not honor St. Benedict’s pray and work motto. Prayer is something done at home or church. Work is something that happens in an office, on a bus, plane, in a hospital, store, or construction zone. Work in our culture is about consumerism, wealth and/or power for the sake of itself.

St. Benedict tells us that our work is prayer and our prayer is what gives meaning to our work. The Divine Office is called “The work of God.” We pray to deepen our relationship with God. We work to become co-creators with God. Our work in cooperation with God’s Grace helps to build the Reign of God. And so we pray with the Psalmist; “Prosper the works of our hands.”

To live as a contemplative is to search for union with God in everything we do. The contemplative life is lived as a continuous and ceaseless prayer in our work, relationships and moments of silence and solitude. Everything we do is a part of the whole continuum of God’s goodness in the here and now. We are to let go of believing it is all up to us, or that we are alone without a purpose. We are where we are because of God’s extravagant love through Jesus Christ our Savior. In and through that love, the Holy Spirit empowers us to live into our lives of prayer and work.

How do you see prayer and work happening in your life?

Amen.

Peace be with all who enter here.

Brother Anselm Philip, OSB

Visit my website to learn about my ministry of Spiritual and Grief Companionship.

Of you feel led to buy me some coffee to help support this ministry, please scroll down to the bottom of the right sidebar and click on the Benedictine Coffee Mug. Thank you so much.

Reflection on God Knows You

“Now the word of the Lord came to me saying, “Before I formed you in the womb I knew you, and before you were born I consecrated you….” (See Jeremiah 1:4-5a).

Many of the great spiritual authors have written that “the foundation of any spirituality is self knowledge.” Knowing ourselves is a life long journey. As our bodies go through the stages of life, our interior self travels further than where we physically stand. Our minds wander. Our hearts become fragile and broken. Our souls experience the brunt of the decisions we make, or others made for us. The journey can feel hopeless and fruitless.

The contemplative grows through God’s grace of self-awareness. A person who lives as a contemplative accepts the struggle to receive through faith what God is doing with us. As we read from the Prophet Jeremiah, God knew us before we were formed in our mother’s womb. God consecrated us to search for union with God in the here and now before we knew ourselves. Through the salvation brought to us by Jesus Christ, God has empowered us in the Holy Spirit to be God’s holy people. God loves us and brings us healing and wholeness in silence, solitude and contemplation.

The spiritual exercise of the prayerful reading of Scripture called Lectio Divina moves the Bible verse we are reading from our minds to our hearts. Once the words or sentence is in the whole of ourselves; we are to let the Holy Spirit teach us things about ourselves and ways that we can deepen our relationship with God in our lives. Through the powerful mystery of God’s word, we are transformed from glory to glory, and experience the presence of God. The experience of the holiness of God can become our inspiration to change the world around us.

“In God’s goodness, we are already counted as God’s own….” (From The Prologue to The Rule of St. Benedict).

As the word of God comes to you today, what are you listening to God telling you?

Amen.

Peace be with all who enter here.

Brother Anselm Philip King-Lowe, OSB

Please visit my website to learn about my ministry of Spiritual and Grief Companionship.

If you feel led to buy me some coffee to help support this blog ministry, please scroll down to the bottom of the right sidebar and click on the Benedictine Coffee Mug. Thank you so very much.