Reflection on God’s Fullness

Being Filled

“From [God’s] fullness we have all received grace upon grace.” (John 1:16 NRSV).

We live in a world where we never have enough of anything.  Consumerism tells us that we always need more, the new improved, the larger, the faster, etc.  Advances in technology have given us what is faster, more convenient, more efficient. If you still feel like you do not have enough, give it only a few years and you will get even more.  Will we be satisfied then?  No.  Everything breaks down and slows down.

In the mystery of God’s Word made Flesh in Jesus the Christ; in the in Child born of Mary, the fullness of God has given to us; God’s grace upon grace.  That grace is not only a historical event, it is something that takes place in the here and now.  God’s grace comes to meet us in our present moment to draw us into a deeper awareness of the Presence of God in the Holy Spirit.  The fullness of God comes to fill us to overflowing, as God enters into our human nature in an infant who is so vulnerable, so beautiful.  It gives us so much potential at this moment to encounter God in the heart of our true selves.  We don’t have to have everything figured out, or be sure everything is working just right.  God comes to us as we are, where we are and invites us to receive the fullness of God, which God has given us; grace upon grace.

Contemplative prayer brings us face to face with the grace of God as something to be experienced.  God sees us from God’s point of view and asks that we allow God to lead us on a greater search for union with God, by letting go of our false-sense of self to be embraced as God’s Beloved.  There is no greater mystical experience than that.

“What is not possible for us by nature, let us ask the Lord to supply by the help of his grace.” (The Rule of Saint Benedict, the Prologue).

Are you ready to respond to the fullness of God that you have received as grace upon grace?

Amen.

Brother Anselm Philip King-Lowe, OSB

See; http://www.cos-osb.net

 

Christmas Reflection: Receiving and Responding to the Word

nativity-scene-2560x1600

 

In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God.  All things came into being through him, and without him not one thing came into being.  What has come into being in him was life, and the life was the light of all people.  The light was the light of all people.  The light shines in the darkness, and the darkness did not overcome it.  (John 1:1-5 NRSV).

“But to all who received him, he gave power to become children of God, who were born, not of blood or of the will of the flesh or of the will of man, but of God.  And the Word became flesh and lived among us, and we have seen his glory, the glory of the only son, full of grace and truth.  (John 1:13,14 NRSV).

I want to wish everyone a most blessed and holy Christmas Season.  What a joy it is to share this reflection with you.

The beauty and wonder of this Christmas Eve/Day/Night catches all of our human senses.   We find ourselves caught up in the wonder of God’s love born in Jesus Christ.  The Word made flesh.  The Word that is spoken, written is born into our living and troubled humanity.

The romantic and cozy feeling of Christmas is a bit of a disillusionment. Oh we sing and read those beautiful words of the Angels: “Glory to God in the highest and peace to His people on earth.”  However,  Jesus was born into our human messes.  He came in very dark times with a lot of violence, poverty and helplessness all around Him.  God was born as a vulnerable child into our poverty as one so helpless to tell us that God walks with us as one of us.

The Word came to us in grace and truth so that we who open our hearts to listen to His voice and accept Jesus are given the power to become children of God.  God revealed to us through Christ God’s perspective of all of us being God’s Beloved, with whom God is well-pleased.

God coming to us in the Incarnate Word is the wondrous mystical experience we can breath in and out in our Contemplative and Centering Prayer.  Christ comes to lead us to a deeper awareness so that we may seek union with God.  As we search for that union, God reveals to us through Christ that God has already found us.

May the Word who comes among us on this Christmas Eve/Day/Night, fill your hearts and lives with the love with which He taught us to love God. one another and ourselves.

Amen.

Brother Anselm Philip King-Lowe, OSB

Visit http://www.cos-osb.net

Advent Reflection: Forgive as We Forgive

Lord's Prayer

 

“Assuredly, the celebration of Lauds and Vespers must never pass by without the superior’s reciting the entire Lord’s Prayer at the end for all to hear, because thorns of contention are likely to spring up.  Thus warned by the pledge they make to one another in the very words of this prayer: Forgive us as we forgive (Matt 6:12)”.  (RB 1980: The Rule of Saint Benedict in English and Latin, Chapter 13: The Celebration of Lauds on Ordinary Days. p.209).

One of the more difficult things about beginning to live with a new spouse/partner is getting used to each others habits and routines.  Everything from how one wipes their feet before they walk in the door to where they leave their dirty laundry just drives us crazy.

In a Monastery, the number of different personalities is multiplied by more than six.  In some of the larger Monasteries there can be over 100 Monastics in one community.  The members live on top of each other 24/7.  Old, young, new and the long timers are all in one place.

St. Benedict included the chapter about Lauds and more specifically the words in The Lord’s Prayer: “Forgive as we forgive” because of human nature and the unavoidable consequence of conflict within the community.  Such conflict has the ability to bring division and harm to the wider community.  So, St. Benedict wants to take care of the initial “cut” if you will, before the poison from the wound infects the entire house.

So many things happen in our lives.  Things that are not our fault.  Other times we may have been a little short with someone. If you are like me, there are times in which I think about no one else but myself.

Among the most important persons we need to forgive is ourselves.  Forgiving ourselves is a very important piece of the Contemplative life of prayer and mysticism.  Failing to forgive others and ourselves is very toxic to our relationship with God and those around us.  If we can’t even forgive ourselves; we become our own worst enemy.

A few years ago when I was contemplating what I wanted to do in terms of a church vocation, I was led into a deep experience of the Holy  with the words, “Forgive as we forgive.”  As I walked through my mind with God down the list of people I needed to forgive, God began speaking to my heart concerning all the things I was still holding myself guilty of.  The Holy Spirit and I went through many instances where I blamed myself for things I was not responsible for; yet, I was still punishing myself with a guilt that was not even mine.  It was an experience that set me free from prisons I did not even realize I was keeping myself locked up in.

As we prepare to welcome the Christ Child at the celebration of the Nativity, we recall that Jesus came among us in the midst of our human messes.  Through Jesus, God came to tell us, “It is okay. I am here as one like you, to walk with you.”  Jesus journeys with us to help us forgive ourselves and others.

What do the words, “Forgive as we forgive” mean for you this Advent and Christmas Seasons?

Amen.

Brother Anselm Philip King-Lowe, OSB

Visit us at: http://www.cos-osb.org

Advent Reflection: God Is With Us

Nativity

 

“Behold, a virgin shall conceive and bear a son, and they shall call his name, Emmanuel”  Meaning “God is with us.” (Matthew 1:23, RSV).

There is a lot going on around us.  Preparations for the celebration of Christmas.  Shopping.  Wrapping.  Writing out Christmas cards.  Choirs preparing for the Christmas Eve service.  Organists preparing their pieces with the additional instruments.  Clergy writing sermons, making their holiday rounds for the shut ins, etc.  People are volunteering for the local soup kitchens to serve a Christmas meal for those who are in need.

As we journey through Late Advent to the celebration of the Nativity, we are comforted by the words, “God is with us.”

There are many for whom the Christmas holidays are anything but comfortable and joyful.  Many of us have painful memories of family who are no longer with us.  Last year I was in a year of grief when my mother passed away November 22, 2015.  I was never so happy to see January 2nd arrive.  Perhaps there are families with members in the military who are far from home.  What does “God with us” mean for them?

Whether our lives are in some kind of happy order or not, the mystery that we can celebrate is that God is with us.  God is with us and we are loved beyond our wildest imaginations.  We are loved and viewed by God as God’s beloved in Christ, God’s Beloved Son.  God sees what is in our hearts.  God cares about what is happening, including, but not limited to those moments when our faith is shaken or weakened.

God is with us.  God is here seeking union with us and calling us to seek union with God.

How are you celebrating or longing for the words “God is with us”?

Amen.

Brother Anselm Philip King-Lowe, OSB

Visit http://www.cos-osb.org to learn more about The Contemplatives of Subiaco-Order of Saint Benedict.

Advent Reflection: Keeping Watch in Prayer and Hope

Hope

‘When we live with hope we do not get tangled with concerns for how our wishes will be fulfilled.  So, too, our prayers are not directed toward the gift, but toward the one who gives it.  Our prayers might still contain just as many desires, but ultimately it is not a question of having a wish come true but of expressing an unlimited faith in the giver of all good things.  You wish that…. but you hope in ….

In the prayer of hope, there are no guarantees asked, no conditions posed, and no proofs demanded.  You expect everything from the other without binding the other in any way.  Hope is based on the premise that the other gives only what is good.  Hope includes an openness by which you wait for the promise to come through, even though you never know when, where, or how this might happen” (With Open Hands, by Henri J.M. Nouwen, p73).

This time of the year, children in the thousands are sitting on Santa Clauses’ lap in houses, schools and malls telling him what they want for Christmas.  It is a wonderful and humbling sight.  Children with their eyes a glow with expectation and wonder.  There is an unspoken poverty of spirit at work.  A child knows that they are somewhat helpless to get what they want unless they ask for it.

On the other hand, the childlike behavior of only liking the other so long as we get what we want, lingers on into adulthood.  We live in a very “get it your way” kind of culture.  Technology and corporate investments make it possible year after year to get more, bigger, better, faster and most convenient.  Can many of these be answers to prayer?  Yes they can.  However, we can also innocently nurture in our subconscious a relationship with God that is based primarily on getting what we want through prayer.  In the quote I used above, Nouwen wrote of praying with hope in God the Gift-Giver, so that we are liberated to let go of our own will as if it is our only true end.  If we have our hope in God with purity of heart, we are contented with allowing God to be enough.  We accept with thanksgiving the answer God gives to our prayers; whether or not we get what we want.

If we need an example of God giving us the best of God’s Self so that we can have hope in God; look no further than the mystery we will celebrate on Thursday, December 25th.  I think that is a very good reason to have faith and hope that God will always do what is best for us.

Amen.

Br. Anselm Philip King-Lowe, n/OSB